Create Local ESXi Account Using PowerCLI

In this post we will be going through creating local ESXi account using PowerCLI.

Recently I have had to create local account to allow a monitoring tool to pull information from all ESXi hosts.

We want to automate the user creation and assign the required permissions so that they only have the permission required for a limited time.

First we need to connect to the ESXi Host using PowerCLI

Connect-VIServer
Connection to vCenter

To check what account already exist use the below.

Get-VMHostAccount
List Accounts

To create a new account we will use the New-VMHostAccount command

New-VMHostAccount -Id accountname -Password password -Description Account Description
Create new account

Next we need to assign the required permissions. We can list the current roles using

Get-VIRole
List VMware Roles

We also need an entity to set the permission or the command will error out.

Permission

To list the entity use the

Get-Folder
List Folder

Select the entity that we will have the role applied. In this case we will be applying to the root object so it applies to all objects on the host and will assigning the admin role.

New-VIPermission -Entity (Get-Folder root) -Principal accountname -Role Admin
Set Permission

To remove the account use the below command.

Get-VMHostAccount -User account name | Remove-VMHostAccount -Confirm:$false

Once we have the commands, we can create the script to automate the account creation and role assignment to configure multiple hosts.

Account Creation Script

The scripts uses EsxiHost as the heading for the CSV if you want to use something different the script will need to be updated.

Below is the script running against my test hosts.

.\Create-LocalESXiUser.ps1 -ESXiHostList .\EsxiHosts.csv -ESXiUser useraccount -ESXipass password -ESXiNewUser accountname -ESXiUserPass accountpass -ESXiPermission Permission -ESXiUserdesc "Account Description"
Account creation script

This process can also be used to update the permission for a specific account.

Updating permissions

To download the full script use the below link to github.

https://github.com/TheSleepyAdmin/Scripts/blob/master/VMware/Config/Account/Create-LocalESXiUser.ps1

Configure SNMP On VMware ESXi Using PowerCLI

In this post we will be going through deploying new SNMP configuration to a list of ESXi hosts using PowerCLI. We can add SNMP using ssh and esxcli commands but this will required SSH to be enabled and connecting to each host.

We can use Set-VMHostSNMP command to set the SNMP configuration by conecting to the host using connect-viserver which uses https to connect and does not required SSH to be enabled.

First we need to connect to the ESXi host

Connect-VIServer -Server esxihost.domain.local

use a local account like root to connect

PowerCLI SNMP Command

If you get a certificate error and can’t connect you might need to update the PowerCLI Configuration or install the root cert to trust the self singed cert of the ESXi hosts.

Set-PowerCLIConfiguration -InvalidCertificateAction Ignore -Confirm:$false

Once connected we will be using the below set of command to configure the SNMP settings.

Get-VMHostSnmp | Set-VMHostSnmp

https://developer.vmware.com/docs/powercli/latest/vmware.vimautomation.core/commands/set-vmhostsnmp/#Default

First we will enabled and set the community string

Get-VMHostSnmp | Set-VMHostSnmp -Enabled:$true -ReadOnlyCommunity communityname

PowerCLI SNMP Command

Next we will set the target that traps will be sent.

Get-VMHostSnmp | Set-VMHostSnmp -TargetCommunity communityname -TargetHost snmp.domain.local -TargetPort 162 -AddTarget
PowerCLI SNMP Command

To test I have setup snmp on Ubutu

Ubuntu SNMP check

Now that we have set of command we can create the script. I will be doing a loop through each host and configuring the SNMP.

I also added in some if statement to check if SNMP is already enabled and to check if the target host matches the one that is set in the parameters.

SNMP Script

The full script can be downloaded from the below github link.

https://github.com/TheSleepyAdmin/Scripts/blob/master/VMware/Config/SNMP/Set-ESXiSNMP.ps1

Below is an example of what the csv file should look like if you want to use a different heading the script will need to be updated.

Each of the values will be called as parameter to allow easy re-use below is an example of the SNMP script running against my test hosts.

Using PowerCli can be a quicker way to set and enabled SNMP on a list of hosts rather than having to SSH and use esxcli command. This can also be used to update the existing SNMP configuration to a new traps target.

Allow External Access to vCenter Using Azure Application Proxy

With some of the recent critical vulnerability’s for both VMware and Log4j vulnerability this is has shown again that having vCenter open on the internet is not a good idea as it leave a big target for hackers to try exploit.

There are several ways to avoid having vCenter directly available on the internet, in this post we will be going through publishing using the Microsoft Azure Application Proxy. This will be using Azure AD as an authentication source and we can add addtional security like MFA.

First before we can use the Azure Application Proxy we need to make sure we have an Azure subscription and the appropriate license types. The application proxy is available for users that have either a Azure AD P1 or P2 license.

Once all the pre requisite are meet we can install the Azure Application Proxy, we will be using a Windows Server 2019 VM.

For Windows Server 2019 we need to disable http2 protocol, to disable run the below command from PowerShell.

Set-ItemProperty 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\WinHttp\' -Name EnableDefaultHTTP2 -Value 0

To download the installer, logon to the Azure portal > Azure Active Directory > Application proxy.

Once downloaded run the installer on the server that will be used for the app proxy. To register the connector the minimum rights is to be part of the application administrator role in Azure.

During the install we will be prompted to enter details for an account that has the correct permissions.

The install can take a minute or two to finish.

Once the install has completed the Azure Application proxy connector should show in Azure.

Now that we have the proxy connected to Azure, we will need to register the enterprise application.

Go to Azure AD > Enterprise applications > create your own application

Give the application a name and click create.

Next

  • Give the app a name
  • Add in the internal URL for vCenter
  • Set external URL this can either be an msappproxy.net address or custom domain named
  • Set the pre authentication to either Azure AD or passthrough (to use MFA or conditional access policy set to Azure AD)
  • Set the connector group

I left the addtional settings as the defaults. If the internal and external URL are different (its recommend from Microsoft to use the same DNS address), then to allow the redirect set the translate URLs in > Application Body to yes so allow link translation from the external to internal URL.

Click create, the app can take a few minutes provision.

We can restrict access to the app by using security groups or induvial users access.

Once we have setup the access group we can now connect to the external URL.

If the internal application is using an self singed cert or un trusted certificate authority, then the cert will need to be add to the trusted root cert store on the application proxy server.

This is the TLS error:

There should also be event log 13001 log under Applications and Services Logs/Microsoft- AAD Application Proxy Connector/Admin.

Download the root CA cert from vCenter and install to the trusted root on the server that has the Azure Application Proxy connector installed.

The second option is to use a custom SSL cert for vCenter, I have done a previous post on how to install a custom cert.

Set Custom SSL Certificate on VMware vCenter 6.7 Appliance using Windows CA

After this has been completed the page should now load without issue using the external Azure msapproxy address.

If the application proxy is set to use pre authentication then users will be redirected to the sign in page for Azure and be subject to any conditional access policies.

When connecting from an account that has not been give access rights they will not be able to connect.

The VMware remote console does not work using the Azure Application proxy as it requires both port 443 and 902, the application proxy can’t connect on 902 so the connection fails.

VMware List All Port Groups and Associated VM’s Using PowerCLI

During a recent project we have been starting to use network segregation to give more security and control instead of using a flat network.

This has lead to VM’s being broken up in to there own VMware port groups and segregated VLAN’s.

There are now old port groups that have had all VM’s removed, so we wanted to report on any port groups that have no VM’s associated so that they can be removed as we will hit a issue with max VLAN limit per physical interface.

The quickest way I could think of to create the report was to use PowerCLI, in this post we will go through the process and commands used to create the report.

First we need to connect to vCenter using PowerCLI

We will be using a few different commands in the script.

First we will need to get list of port groups will only be getting distributed port groups as we don’t use standard port groups.

Get-VDPortgroup

Second part of the script is to get the port group view using get-view

Get-View -ViewType Network -Property Name -Filter @{"Name" = "portgroup name"}

We will be using UpdateViewData to add some addtional values to the view to make the script quicker and easier to read see below link for more details on UpdateViewData.

https://blogs.vmware.com/PowerCLI/2011/08/optimize-the-performance-of-powerclis-views.html

To find the properties we wanted to report on we used

Get-VM -Name VMName | Get-View

Use Get-VIObjectByVIView to get the host information.

$vm = Get-VM -name VMName | get-view
(Get-VIObjectByVIView $vm.runtime.host).name

I want to report on the VM name, Host, Cluster and PowerState.

Below we will get the view for the port group and

$networks = Get-View -ViewType Network -Property Name -Filter @{"Name" = "portgroup name"}

$networks | ForEach-Object{($_.UpdateViewData("Vm.Name","Vm.Runtime.Host.Name","Vm.Runtime.Host.Parent.Name","vm.Runtime.PowerState"))}

We can run the below to check if the addtional information has been added to the veiw

$networks.LinkedView.vm.name

Once we have the view working and adding the properties we want we can start to create the full script.

The full script can be copied from the below github link.

https://github.com/TheSleepyAdmin/Scripts/blob/master/VMware/Network/VMware_PortGroupReport.ps1

There are two parameters in the script.

To just output to the console screen use -ConsoleOnly parameter.

To export to csv use the -ReportExport parameter.

Below is a example of the exported csv.

VMware PowerCLI Module 12.4 Update Error

With the release of VMware PowerCLI 12.4 I was updating the module on my LAB servers so I could check out the new command.

When upgrading I was getting the below error which is due to VMware changing the certificate authority used to publish the new module.

Authenticode issuer ‘E=noreply@vmware.com, CN=”VMware, Inc.”, O=”VMware, Inc.”, L=Palo Alto, S=California, C=US’ of the new module ‘VMware.VimAutomation.Sdk’ with version ‘12.4.0.18627054’ from root
certificate authority.

In the release notes from VMware there is a know issue with the certificate. The fix is to remove and re-install the module.

https://blogs.vmware.com/PowerCLI/2021/09/powercli-12-4-whats-new.html

I though I would do a quick post on this incase anyone doesn’t know the process.

To check where the module is installed run the below command.

Get-Module -ListAvailable VMware.PowerCLI
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-21.png

In my case the module was installed in C:\Program Files\WindowsPowerShell\Modules.

Next we need to remove the old modules, below is a list of the folders that make up the VMware PowerCLI 12.0 module.

After removing the folder we now have to install the new module using Install-Module

Install-Module VMware.PowerCLI

Once completed we should now have PowerCLI version 12.4

Using VMware PowerCLI Get-EsxCli

In this post we will be going through using the PowerCLI Get-EsxCli commandlet, which is used to call EsxCli command from PowerShell instead of having to SSH directly to the the ESXi host.

This can be useful when trying to gather information from multiple hosts instead of connecting on to each host with SSH or updating configuration settings.

First step is to connect to vCenter, once connected we can run the Get-EsxCli command and this will return the list of namespaces that can be use to gather information or set configuration settings.

We will be using -V2 as this sets Get-EsxCli to use version 2 interface as version 1 is being deprecated and will be removed in a later version.

Get-EsxCli -VMHost esxihost -V2

We can set the Get-EsxCli command to a variable so that we can call the namespaces, below will call the network namespace, once called there will be a list of addtiaonl namespaces that can be called.

$vmhostesxcli = Get-EsxCli -VMHost esxihost -V2
$vmhostesxcli.network

Once we select a namespace there should also be a list of methods that can be called these can be used to run specific actions like list or get to return information.

To list all nic’s we can call the nic and then list namespace

$vmhostesxcli.network.nic.list.invoke()

To gather info on details like driver version we can use the get method, in v1 you use to be able to call the nic name directly but if you try this in v2 the below error will be returned.

If specified, the arguments parameter must contain a single value of type Hashtable.

This is due to the method requiring a hash table parameter. If we call the help method it should return the valid parameters. If the parameter has a hyphens remove this or the command wont work.

For the nic namespace the parameter is nicname and needs to be called as a hash table.

$vmhostesxcli.network.nic.get.invoke(@{nicname="vmnic1"})

There might be some namespaces that have multiple properties like driverinfo under nic, these can be called by adding the property like below.

$vmhostesxcli.network.nic.get.invoke(@{nicname="vmnic1"}).DriverInfo

Now that we have the command we can start to build out a script to export information.

In this case we will be getting all hosts, listing all NIC’s and getting the drivers info.

The above shows that Get-EsxCli can be very good for retrieving information, if we wanted to set a configuration we can use similar command syntax but use the set method.

In this case we will update the Power policy settings on all host, we could do this manually by going to the Configure > Hardware > Overview > Power Management one each host and update the power policy settings

but doing this on a larger cluster is a lot of effort. To update using PowerCli we can first create the script to report on the current host power policy.

To update the policy settings we will use the set method like the below.

$vmhostesxcli.hardware.Power.policy.set.Invoke(@{id="1")})

Below are the 4 different power policy’s.

IDPower Policy
1High Performance
2Balanced
3Lower Power
4Custom

We can then take the above and create a re-usable script to report or set the power policy on all host in one go.

To download a copy of the either of the above script use the below link to my Github these can be used as reference if you want to create your own scripts for other settings.

https://github.com/TheSleepyAdmin/Scripts/tree/master/VMware/EsxCli

Upgrading VMware Tools Different Methods

Keeping VMware tools updated is an import task to improve performance and keep up with security / bug fixes. VMware tools are not required for a VM to run but are used to enable VMware features.

VMware tools can be upgrade in a few different methods. In this post we will go through some of these different methods these range from completely manual by upgrading to fully automated using VM options, scripting or application deployment.

First method is to manually mount the tools on the VM by right clicking and then install in the guest OS, this is the slowest method and is fine if there is a few VM to upgrade but not really great at scale.

Second method is to set the VMware tools to check for upgrades during power on. This method can be good when doing OS patching as when patching a VM the tools will also be upgraded.

To enabled this either edit the VM setting and go to VM Options > VMware tools > Tools Upgrade

To enabled on multiple VM’s we can use PowerCli to bulk update the VM options.

To view the current upgrade policy we can use

(Get-VM VMName  | Get-View).config.Tools

To update the VM Option using PowerCli we can create a new VM configuration and then apply to a list of VMs in a text file using a loop. To set the upgrade policy back to manual just update tools upgrade policy from upgradeAtPowerCycle to manual.

$VMs = Get-Content C:\Temp\VMs\VMware_Tools_Upgrade.txt
$Toolsconfig = New-Object VMware.Vim.VirtualMachineConfigSpec
$Toolsconfig.tools = New-Object VMware.Vim.ToolsConfigInfo
$Toolsconfig.tools.toolsUpgradePolicy = "upgradeAtPowerCycle"

foreach ($VM in $VMs) {
Write-Warning "Setting VM Tools to Upgrade on PowerOn for $VM"
(Get-VM -Name $VM | Get-View).ReconfigVM($Toolsconfig)

 }

vCenter should show the tasks that where run to update the VM option.

Now when the VM’s reboot they should auto upgrade to the newest version.

Third method is to use a script to update the tools. This can be used when we want to have more control over when VMware tools are upgrade.

This can be done by using the VMware PowerCli Update-Tools command

For one VM we could use

Update-Tools VMName

Below is an example of using a text file with VMs names. I used the no reboot parameter to stop the VM from rebooting after the tools are updated.



$VMs = Get-Content C:\Temp\VMs\VMware_Tools_Upgrade.txt
foreach ($VM in $VMs) {
Get-VM -Name $VM  | Update-Tools -NoReboot
}

If we check vCenter we should see the upgrade task start

The last method I would use would be an application deployment tool to push out the latest VMware tools.

I use Microsoft Endpoint Configuration Manager for most of my deployment so this will be where I will be creating the deployment package.

Mount the VMware tools on on of the VMs and copy the install files.

Open the ConfigMgr console > Software Library > Application Management > Application

Create a new application and set to manual specify.

Add in the application details.

Add a new Deployment Type

Set type to manual specify.

Give the deployment a name

I used the document for the command line switches for the tools upgrade its for version 5.5 but the same switches worked.

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/5.5/com.vmware.vmtools.install.doc/GUID-CD6ED7DD-E2E2-48BC-A6B0-E0BB81E05FA3.html

Add the path to the copied install files, install command line switches and the uninstall command line (not required)

Command line: setup.exe  /S /v “/qn REBOOT=R

Next set a detection method this can be either MSI install code if available but I used file version for the vmtoolsd.exe.

below is what the detection clause should look like.

Set the install behavior to Install for system and logon requirement to Whether or not a user is logged on.

I didn’t set any requirements or dependencies. Review the summary page and then complete the application wizard.

Once completed the wizard will go back to the create application wizard.

Follow the wizard and complete.

Now that the application is create we can deploy out to the required VM’s.

Right click and go to deploy.

Select the device collection that will be used to put VMs that will have there tools upgraded.

Add the application to the required distribution points so that content is transferred.

There are two install type available or required. To force the install use required.

For scheduling I setup as soon as possible but this can be set to what ever time the application should start to install.

I left user experience and alerts as default and completed the deployment wizard.

Once the application deployment has been assigned to the client the app should now show in software center on the client and start the upgrade.

After the upgrade completes the version of VMware tools should be 11.3 and will prompt for reboot if required.

These are the main way I manage VM tools upgrades, I usually try to use VM options for most severs as it works well and requires the least manual intervention to keep VMware tools up to date.

VMware Site Recovery Manager 8.4 Upgrade Invalid certificate when reconnecting to vCenter

I was upgrading our VMware SRM appliance from version 8.2 to 8.4 recently. The upgrade completed successfully but when logged on to the SRM management console and I tried to reconfigure the appliance to connect back to vCenter I started to get a error.

To get the fixes for some of the errors I had to log a case with VMware support who where very helpfully in getting the issue resolved. So decided to do a post on this in case anyone else runs in to the same issue.

Below is the initial error I got when trying to reconnect to vCenter.

The error was about an invalid cert and failed soap response to vCenter

Exit code: 61

[backtrace begin] product: VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager, version: 8.4.0, build: build-18048862, tag: drconfig, cpu: x86_64, os: linux, buildType: release
backtrace[03] libvmacore.so[0x001BC4BD]
backtrace[04] dr-configurator[0x00151AB4]
backtrace[05] dr-configurator[0x000663BA]
backtrace[06] dr-configurator[0x000EDCB4]
backtrace[07] dr-configurator[0x000F66FC]
backtrace[08] dr-configurator[0x000F79AF]
backtrace[09] dr-configurator[0x000F1788]
backtrace[10] dr-configurator[0x000BB3DD]
backtrace[11] libvmacore.so[0x002EFFED]
backtrace[12] libvmacore.so[0x002F1C32]
backtrace[13] libvmacore.so[0x0040327E]
backtrace[14] libpthread.so.0[0x00007F87]
backtrace[15] libc.so.6[0x000F35BF]
[backtrace end]
Caused by:
(vmodl.fault.InvalidArgument) {
faultCause = (vmodl.MethodFault) null,
faultMessage = ,
invalidProperty = “Invalid certificate”
msg = “Received SOAP response fault from []: create

}

I checked the existing PSC cert in the summary page of the SRM management web client but this was fine and showing as valid, I checked the vCenter cert that was also valid so I was a bit confused as to what cert the error was actually referring to as it just said invalid certificate which isn’t all that helpful.

I decided to to check the appliance certificate and that had expired about 4 months ago.

To re-issue the cert we should just need to go to change and select change to reissue the cert, but my issue was that the appliance had previously been set with just a host name and not FQDN so when I tried to generate the cert I got an error for no FQDN.

It looks like the older version of SRM allows cert to be generated without FQDN’s but not version 8.4.

This was going to cause an issue with the site paring as the names had already been configure so most likely once the new cert was generated with the FQDN and connected to vCenter I would probable need to reconfigure the site paring.

First I had to change the host name under networking to use a FQDN.

Once that was changed I tried to re-issued the self singed cert using the new FQDN name but this failed with the below error. (This is where I got stuck and had to open a service request 🙂 )

The certificate’s Subject Alternative Name does not contain one of the folowing: – an IP address that matches the SRM host IP – a DNS name that matches the SRM host name – a common Name field that matches the SRM host name.

VMware support thought the issue was due to the plugin caching the old host name, so I had to then go to reconfigure on the summary page and on name and extension had to change the local host to use the new FQDN to update the plugin settings as it was set to custom and using the old host name.

The reconfigure will most likely fail due to the cert but it will update the plugin hostname which then allow the cert to be generated.

After this I was able to generate the new cert, the web console took a few minutes to come back while the cert was updated.

Once both of the above where completed SRM successfully connect back to vCenter.

After the connection was made to vCenter I had to reconnect in the SRM site pairing to update the SRM URL and certificate from the SRM UI console.

I had to complete the exact same steps on the second appliance.

This was a bit of annoying issue to get around as the errors where pretty vague and the logs didn’t really give much information.

Hopefully the rest of my upgrade goes a bit smother than the SRM upgrade.

Migrate from Active Directory Integrated Windows Authentication VMware vSphere 7.0

VMware is depreciating Integrated Windows Authentication in vSphere 7.0. The feature will be removed in a later release. Below is from the VMware KB.

Support for IWA continues to be available in vSphere 7.0 and will be phased out in a future release. Although IWA can still be configured, we highly recommend using AD over LDAP or Federated Identity (AD FS).

Deprecation of Integrated Windows Authentication (78506) (vmware.com)

In this post we will be going through changing over to using Active Directory over LDAP. We will also be using LDAPS as this is secured with certificates and is much better from a security side and Microsoft are requiring this on applications that use LDAP.

2020 LDAP channel binding and LDAP signing requirements for Windows (microsoft.com)

If you haven’t configured a certificate on your domain controller yet to allow LDAPS I would configure this first before proceeding with the swap over to Active directory over LDAP identity provider.

If we check the existing AD IWA we can see the warning that the feature is depreciated.

I usually create a new account for each applications LDAP connections just so I keep track of what account is used where.

For LDAP authentication in a Windows domain a standard account with just domain users right should have enough permission as it best to use least privilege for service accounts.

To confirm in an Windows AD domain is setup to use LDAPS we can use the ldp on a devices that has the active directory tools enabled to confirm LDAPS connection.

Open and click connect and add in the server name, set port to 636 and tick SSL.

If the configuration is retuned then LDAPS is working.

Once we have the account created and confirmed that LDAPS is working we can start setting up AD over LDAP in vCenter.

Since we will be using the same domain name as the IWA source we need to remove this first or it will cause error when trying add the LDAPS source.

Logon to vCenter web client > Menu > Administration > single sign on > configuration.

Under Identity sources select the IWA and click remove.

Click ok to confirm removal.

Once the IWA is removed we can now add the AD LDAP connection.

Click Add in the Identity source page and select Active Directory over LDAP

Add in the required details.

Name: Friendly name for the identity source.

Base DN: Is the level at which search in AD will start for user or groups to search all AD just use the top level or select sub OU to limit the searches.

Domain name: FQDN of the domain

Domain alias: this is the NetBIOS / pre windows 2000 domain name

When I select any domain controller I was getting the below.

Cannot configure identity source due to Failed to probe provider connectivity [URI: ldaps://domainl ]; tenantName [vsphere.local], userName [User] Caused by: Can’t contact LDAP server.

To work around this I had to specific my DC manually.

As I have a certificate issue from an internal certificate authority I will be selecting the CA cert for LDAPS as this should trust any cert issued by the CA on my domain controllers.

Click Add to complete the AD over LDAP identity source.

If we check the websso.log under /var/log/vmware/sso on the vCenter appliance, we can see the certificate being verified when we logon with a domain account.

We have now move from IWA to AD over LDAP all existing groups and roles should still work.

Filtering VMware vCenter Server Events Using PowerCLI

Recently we needed to review some changes and remote console events to check what user was accessing a particular VM and what changes where made.

I find searching event in the vCenter web client is a bit slow, I prefer to use Get-VIEvent as it has multiple parameters that can be used to search and can also use regular expression to filter by patterns.

I decided to do a blog post on how to filter events to show the different options that I use regularly to filter events.

First we need to connect to vCenter sever using a computer that has PowerCLI installed

Connect-VIServer vCenterServer

Once connected we can start to use Get-VIEvent, to return event for a specific object we can use -entity parameter and the object name.

In the below example I am getting the last event for my LAB-Win10 VM

Get-VIEvent -Entity ObjectName -Maxsamples 1

We can also filter by entity and user name is we know the user is tied to the event.

Get-VIEvent -Entity VM -Username User

We can filter the events by time range.

Get-VIEvent -Start "11/07/2021 20:48" -Finish "11/07/2021 21:00" | Select-Object EventTypeId,CreatedTime

Another option for filtering is to use where-object and search for a specific event message.

Get-VIEvent -Entity VM | Where-Object {$_.FullFormattedMessage -Like "VM started"}

There are addtional properties like host, ComputeResource, datacenter…. that are not return as readable values unless you format the results.

To format the result we can use select-object and create an array to give a name to the property and select the property value. Below will show the datacenter, cluster and host the event was create on.

Get-VIEvent -Entity object -Username User | Select-Object Message,CreatedTime,UserName,@{N="DataCenter";E={$_.DataCenter.Name}},@{N="Compute";E={$_.ComputeResource.Name}},@{N="Host";E={$_.Host.Name}}

Below is an example showing what the event looks like before and after using the array’s to return the readable values.

Once we the events we want we can either review them in the PowerShell console or use Export-csv to export the results.